Archives for skateboarding

Linked by Ink: The Ambush x Skinwerks Collab

Craig Foster

Craig Foster

Skateboarding, tattoos, and art have been culturally forged together through decades of avant garde contrarianism, a blunt questioning of societal norms, and a passion for personal expression. The relationship between skateboarding and tattoos can be seen everywhere from board graphics to the amount of ink on the archetypal skater’s body. As skateboarding, art, and tattoos weave in and out of each other’s existence they leave lasting impressions on one another. In Atlanta, none have done that more than Ambush Board Co., Craig Foster, Jules Woods, and Skinwerks Tattoo.

Craig Foster has been in and around skateboarding since 1983. As a young skateboarder growing up, Craig became enamored with the art that adorned the bottoms of skate decks in the 1980s. He still remembers his first few boards: a Schmitt Stix Lucero, Schmitt Stix Grosso, and a Vision Gator. To this day, Craig still drops by the shop regularly to take mental inventory of the latest graphics. The parallels between skateboarding and tattoo artists are apparent though they may not be obvious. Skateboarding has always been about the skater, his board, and what he does with that board. Creativity, style, aggression, and personal expression are hallmarks of a great skateboarder. It’s what sets skateboarders apart and makes you watch the latest web clip over and over again. The same can be said for a tattoo artist and his tattoo gun. A great tattoo artist can put all of his emotions into a design that is inspired by all of yours.

Craig’s personal love affair with art and skateboarding hit a crossroads in 1995 when he started tattooing full time. With a family to support and his only means of making a living laying in his ability to use his hands, Craig put down the skateboard and started focusing on his craft. When you’re a tattoo artist, a broken wrist can put you in the bread lines. It was this unescapable fact that motivated Craig to push his art to greater heights. It was then that Craig began to make a name for himself in the Atlanta tattoo scene.

Ambush and Craig first crossed paths in 1997 when Craig inked up Ambush shop rat and team rider, Chris Delarm. Craig drew a more realist adaptation of Mike Vallely’s Elephant design on the back of Chris’ shoulder. He quickly became known as THE guy to get a tattoo from by nearly all those affiliated with Ambush. Over the years, Ambush employees Brent Houle, Paul Lizon, Charles Chatov, Alecia Sundberg, Cameron McLane, and John Turnbull have all had work done by Craig.

Jules Woods got his first tattoo at the age of eighteen by an artist named John Mihalic. As so often happens in the intimate setting of getting a tattoo, John and Jules became friends. Jules was making art on his own when John asked him to learn the tattoo trade and apprentice under him. Jules’ skills developed quickly and within four months of graduating high school, and less than a year after getting his first tattoo, Jules began tattooing full time.

Jules bounced around tattooing in shops in Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Virginia, and Tennessee before making his way to West Georgia. In his thirteen years as a professional tattoo artist, Jules has worked in twelve shops picking up influences along the way. Craig and Jules met through a mutual friend named Josh Prentice before he passed away in 2007. Craig and Jules became close while working at a tattoo convention in Richmond, VA shortly after. The shop Jules worked in at the time put on the convention. Their budding friendship became a professional partnership when Jules moved down to Carrollton and became part of the Skinwerks team in February of 2010.

Whereas Craig’s tattoo style in undeniably new school, Jules’ work is more neo-traditional. Jules likes to stylize conventional tattoos with more realistic characteristics. Ask Craig to ink you up with a old-style pirate ship and he will flat out refuse. Request that from Jules, and you’ll get a more realistic and detailed version of a grimy, haunted clipper.

Jules’ philosophy is simple: make art that would look good as a tattoo and make tattoos that would look good as art. After walking around Jules’ workspace, it’s easy to see how he blurs the lines between a living room piece and a chest piece. Craig may be the innovator, but Jules definitely has the talent of a classical artist with a penchant for the gritty.

Craig’s art is a modern nod to a simpler time when tattoos didn’t necessarily have to mean anything. It’s great for tattoos to tell a story, but only if that story isn’t chock full of BS just to pick up chicks. Craig’s tatts incorporate “whimsical characters” that “laugh with a bit of sarcasm”, bold colors, and a strong light source. If you know Craig’s work, you can spot it on a swath of skin from across the room.

It was Craig’s memorable style, ability to perform under pressure, and a recommendation from Jesse Smith (Inkmaster Season 2) that landed Craig a spot on Inkmaster Season 3. Craig’s dichotomous experience on Inkmaster was replete with both Yin and Yang. As you might expect, reality TV is not exactly real. If a producer needed Craig to have a bad day, they would send in a client to intentionally push him to madness. The producers sculpted reality into the outcomes that they felt would make for good TV through editing and creating situations from nothing. Craig’s goal in agreeing to do the show was to open viewers’ eyes to what a genuine tattoo artist was actually like. Knowing from watching the previous season, Inkmaster was, either inadvertently or by design, portraying tattoo artists as obnoxious, cocky, hot headed, Jersey Shore types. Craig wanted to show America and beyond that this was not the way he viewed the tattoo industry and wanted you to experience his world through his actions on the show. The producers eventually saw the wisdom in his approach and let him do his thing.

Since Inkmaster, Craig has been continuously bombarded with appointment requests. In the months after the show aired, his waiting list exceeded 200 people. At one point, Craig had to stop taking on new customers.

Craig had always had a creative itch that seemed like it may never be scratched. It’s not often that clients offer up their skin to your personal ambitions. Most customers micro manage the tattoo process to the point of nausea for the artist. Craig needed an outlet to do something fun and on his own terms. What came out of it was Snactoos. Snactoos is a playful mix of junk food and comic book characters. In Craig’s mind, sushi is always possessed, ice cream and corn dogs are maniacal, and doughnuts want to be your best friend. And those quirky Snactoos characters have caught on making a nice little side business for the Inkmaster. He has even put a few on some people’s skin.

Craig & Lee

Craig & Lee

 

So, in celebration of our two distinct yet congruent brands moving in harmony with one another over the years,  we announce the Ambush x Skinwerks collaboration. Craig Foster has created a signature Ambush Board Co. Snactoo to go along with his Mr. Yellow Tail design. Both are featured on a pair of Ambush skateboard decks and matching tee shirts. Jules laid out his Torch art on a baseball tee and his Skull piece on a tee shirt. Both have complimenting decks as well.

Ambush Snactoos

Ambush Snactoos

We hope you enjoy them as much as we enjoyed bringing them to you.  LTD Shirts available online NOW!

Ambush Alumni: Ryan Dearth

Since opening our doors in 1997, we have been blessed with a revolving door of badass staff.  While some have stayed to push Ambush further in its evolution and to help cultivate the next group of young up-and-comers, others have gone out on their own and accomplished some pretty rad sh!t.   This is an ode to those who used Ambush as their career launch pad.  Whether you recognize them or not, their presence was highly valued during their time spent at Ambush…and we’re hyped that these guys are out there making moves and doing big things.

DVS Skateboarding Filmer

Ryan Dearth grew up skateboarding and filming his friends here in the Atlanta area.  He started working at Ambush in 1999, when the store was still located in the shopping center across the street from its current location, right next to Sidelines and whatever that laser tag joint was called at the time.  After his time at Ambush and years spent filming and submitting footage to 411VM and ON Video, Ryan left Georgia for sunny California.  Using some of the connections he made from working at the shop and sending in his footage, Dearth had gotten a job in the DVS warehouse and worked his way into an in-house filmer/editor position for DVS and Matix.

It is no surprise that the skateboard industry rivals Fort Knox when it comes to entry or employment.  Almost every kid’s dream as soon as he/she stepped on a skateboard was to become a professional skateboarder.  For some..that dream still lives, but many of us find out that the ability and talent required may exceed our physical capabilities.  Without losing the passion or love for skateboarding, the next logical step would be to aspire to work for a company related to skateboarding, whether that be board, shoes, or clothing companies.

I asked Ryan to give any advice for someone looking to follow a similar path.

Starting off, make a dope shop video and pass it around to the mags, the Berrics and any of the shop riders’ sponsors. Study videos. Pay attention to angles and editing for ideas. Make sure you’re settings and filming are on point. Film anything and everything. It’s like anything else you do, the more you do it the better you are. If you work for a shop, take advantage and create your own content for the site, i.e. trick tips, parts, board set-ups, contests, video release parties with interviews (it sucks to do, but its a learning experience). Do online tutorials in your spare time, i.e. editing, color correcting, effects, lighting, audio, video…if it’s truly your passion do what you can to be great at it in all aspects.

You pretty much have to move to CA to be a skate filmer…. Having an outgoing personality is a plus. Put yourself out there to make things happen. Just moving to CA isn’t gonna make it happen, unless you already have an in somewhere or with someone.

A lot of what got me to where I am today was on-the-job-training and working with other people.

The saying “It’s all about who you know” is completely true.

Unfortunately, there is no sure-fire way to get a cool industry job.  One recurring theme after asking a bunch of people who work within the skate industry is that most of them feel as though they were in the right place at the right time.  The only way for that to happen is to put yourself in enough situations where that kind of opportunity can arise.  Basically, pack your bags, you’re going to California.

Enjoy some old and new pieces of Dearth’s work…

“Dirty South” – Late 90’s – Early 2000’s

DVS Does Detroit

5 Skate Trip Essentials

There are not many things in life more exciting than skate trips with your friends.  The thought of being free from normal life and hitting the open road is enough to get anyone’s juices flowing.  Choose your destination, load up the car, collect gas money, and BOOM you’re off to make memories that will last a lifetime.  After more than a decade of travelling the country with my friends, I have compiled a list of essentials for your skate trip, outside of the most obvious.

 

Road Trip

 

1.  Skate Tool

Skate Tool

DUHHH.  Everyone should have one somewhere in their car or bag at any given moment.  With that said, skate tools are similar to lighters in the sense that they are hard to keep track of when you let a bunch of people use them.  They seem to come and go as they please and the universe has a funny way of bringing them back to us, in the form of someone else’s skate tool.  Don’t get caught slippin’ at some spot hours away from the nearest skate shop without a tool.

 

2.  An Abundance of Clean Socks and Underwear

 

Clean socks and underwear

Lets face it, skateboarders (especially when on the road) are disgusting creatures covered in dirt and grime.  It helps to try and cover up your stench as much as possible.  No one in their right mind wants to have a bunch of dudes crashing on their floor when they all smell like feet and farts.

 

3.  iPhone or iPod Stocked with Music

 

iPod

While this one seems to be another no-brainer, you’d be surprised how many times I’ve been driving through rural areas and had no cell phone service, and a very limited supply of tunes.  Nowadays kids have a tendency to just use YouTube or similar music apps to play music, but when you’re outside of your coverage area, all you have are shitty radio stations.  If you’re lucky, someone may have a CD or two laying around from ancient times.  Despite your parents’ “nationwide coverage” plan you’ve been mooching off of, cellular dead zones exist all over the place from the mountains of Tennessee all the way to New Mexico and Arizona’s lonely desert highways.

 

4.  Bluetooth Speaker

 

Nixon Blaster

In the words of MC5, “Kick out the Jams, Mother F*****s!!”  These things are dopest things since sliced bread.  They give you the opportunity to bring your tunes with you wherever you go, wirelessly.  Take those headphones out, ya little shit, we’re jammin’ over here.  I give all the credit to the Muska for this one.

 

5.  Foam Roller

 

Foam Roller

Some of you may or may not be familiar with these little angels sent down from skate heaven.  Skate trips are very rough on your body, and the older you get the more painful they become.  Taking some time in the morning or at the spot to roll out some of your sore muscles accumulated from long hours of skating and sleeping on hardwood floors can really make a difference.  Your body will thank you later.  Rob Welsh knows what’s up.

 

Let me know what’s on your skate trip checklist in the comments below.

Iconic Atlanta Video Parts

Atlanta Traffic

Atlanta

Watching skate videos is a part of every skateboarder’s life.  Everyone has a taste of their own and not everyone can agree on which video is the best.  One thing is for certain though, local videos definitely hold a little more value than your average pro video.  Although the quality of the skating within the video may not always be as good, there is always something special about watching video parts of those older guys you see around town all the time at all the spots you love to skate.  Skate videos have been around for a long time.  In an effort to bring you a broader timeline of epic Atlanta video parts much larger than my own spectrum, I had to reach out to some of the more seasoned veterans in the game.  These first two are not technically local videos, but they were among the first few times Atlanta skateboarders had big time video parts.

1. Andy Howell in New Deal’s 1281 (1991) – This part came out when I was still wearing diapers and sucking on my thumb, but to others a little older than me it changed everything…

“The main one for me was Andy Howell in 1281.  I had read his Transworld pro spotlight about a hundred times and my pen pal buddy from up here told me to check out the New Deal 1281 vid when I could and said there was tons of Atlanta footage in Andy’s part. I still watch that part today. It was the first time, being from Jones County, at 13 years old that I “had” to go skate in Atlanta somehow… Skating was starting to transition at that time. It was very rough filmed and by looking at it today, kinda sloppy skating. But the song, his clothes, the switch and nollie shit he was doing was beyond what anyone else did. It wasn’t the clear day school yard that Vallely and Templeton skated. It looked and seemed a lot cooler than the other footage in that video. Plus, it was “real”. Like, I knew where Atlanta was. F*****g 2 hours up the freeway. California looked awesome, but it may as well said Russia. It wasn’t feasible. It seemed like story land stuff.” – Jeremiah Babb of Bender Hardware

 

2. Daniel Powell in Underworld Element’s SkyPager (1993) – This Daniel Powell part was also a bit before my time, but was suggested to me by a couple different sources for really putting Atlanta on the map.  With innovative tricks, great style, and a serious eye-opener at the SunTrust building right off Peachtree Street how could anyone deny the awesomeness of this part?  Turn the volume up and feel the 90’s.

 

3. Chris Head in Raped Inc.’s Conspiracy (1998) – In the 5 year gap between the previous part and this awesome Chris Head part, the quality of videos changed quite a bit.  People really began to figure out how they wanted skateboarding to look and how it should be filmed.  I asked Matt Creasy, a local skateboarder/filmmaker, what his favorite Atlanta parts are and he answered with this… “Chris Head or Jeremiah Babb in the last Raped video.  That was the first time I saw people from Atlanta on par with the rest of skateboarding.”

 

4. Jeremiah Babb and Graham Bickerstaff in Ryan Dearth’s Dirty South (1999-2000) – These are my two personal favorite Atlanta skateboarders.  I was introduced to skating a year or two after this video had come out.  I remember seeing this video for the first time and having the hardest time grasping the concept that not only were these dudes killing it so hard, but they were skating spots that I had access to.  It brought to mind the idea that, “If they can do it, so can we.”  It was my first window into what Atlanta skating was all about.  Good skating, good times with no room for bullshit.  Graham 360 flipped over the rail at BellSouth, who does that!?

 

5. Mike Devine in Ruin Skateshop’s Nouveau (2004) – I grew up watching skate videos like Zero’s Dying To Live, Flip Sorry and many other typical hammer-style videos of the early 2000’s, so when Ruin Skateshop’s video Nouveau came out I was blown away.  The first reason being that it was another amazing local video featuring guys I had become friends with over the years and the second reason being that it was the first time I realized that there were other styles of skating that appealed to me rather than just your average stair and handrail skating.  Mike Devine has a really clean and unique style that is very pleasing to the eye.  This part along with the whole video is worth a gander.

 

6. Justin Brock and David Clark in Matt Swinsky’s Southern Comfort (2007) –  These parts, to me, are truly amazing, not only for the skating, but this was the first time I got to see first hand in person what it really takes to film a gnarly video part.  My friends and I were lucky enough to be around for quite a bit of this video, on the session or at the party afterwards.  We were the younger kids trying to be cool like those older dudes, and this one set the bar pretty high for us.  Justin is a skateboarder’s skateboarder, and David skates Atlanta like we all wish we could.  They both definitely left their mark on a lot of Atlanta spots with this one.

 

Honorable Mentions:

Atlanta Metrospective Logic Issue 01 (1999)

Stormy Pruett in Dog Shit

Phil Kent and Graham Bickerstaff in Rusty Trombone

Chris Head and Mike Devine in Rusty Trombone

Mike Summers and John Sheffield in Rusty Trombone

James Coleman in Ruin’s Nouveau

Kevin Radley in VHS Tape

David Clark for Bender Hardware

I am almost positive I missed a couple gems, so feel free to let me know in the comments below…

 

Etnies Marana Vulc Full Review

Marana Vulc Wear Test

The first thing I noticed when I slipped my foot into the Marana Vulc is the fact that they run a little big.  I wear a size 9 (US) in most shoes, and this 9 is a tad bit big.  I’d probably be better off with an 8.5.  The heel hold is snug and there is a very prominent arch support.  From the heel heading towards the toe, the shoe opens up to be pretty wide leaving plenty of space for your toes to stretch out.  The collar and tongue are made of a breathable mesh providing some much needed airflow.  All in all, it is a pretty comfortable shoe.  This shoe is built to endure the harshest abuse you can give it.  Due to their tank like construction, the break-in process may take a bit longer than expected. The STI Evolution foam footbed provides good support for impact and everyday wear. The vulcanized version of this shoe is definitely more appealing aesthetically than its cupsole counterpart. The cupsole interpretation has a bigger logo on the side and kind of reminds me of some crappy Etnies mall shoe, but it’s vulcanized brother has a more subtle skateboarder-friendly vibe.

  • Rubberized toe cap for durability

  • inverted stitching around the side panel to prevent blow-outs

  • great arch support

  • highly ventilated tongue and collar for breath-ability

  • vulcanized sole

  • fits half size bigger

  • wide toe box

After Five Hours

The first flick in the Marana Vulc is a big reminder that vulcanized shoes have superior grip compared to cupsole shoes.  The sole is tall and the toe cap is rubberized, leaving very little room for ripping around the toe.  Due to the bulky sole and rubberized toe cap, the break in process was a little slow.  Once those kickflips become familiar again, everything comes together nicely.  Like most vulcanized shoes, the first hour or so can be frustrating. It would take many hours of flip ins and flip outs to put a hurting on this shoe. If you lean more towards heelflips rather than kickflips, you’ll run into some ripping issues sooner.  Your heels and arches are protected well, but my main area for concern is with the padding around the ball of your foot.  Having less support in this region provides added board feel, but at the cost of protecting the ball of your foot.

Shout out to Etnies for hookin’ up the shoes!

March Radness is Coming!

What’s up everyone? Ambush is proud to announce that it will be hosting the first contest at the new Kennesaw Skatepark called March Radness. No mushy flat ground game of skate. This is REAL street/pool style skateboarding for your eyes to see. This is your chance to show Ambush what you got and show the City of Kennesaw why it was such a good idea building this park. Don’t wanna compete? It’s free to watch and come hang out with the Ambush crew. There will be tons of talented locals putting on a awesome show!  Big thanks to all the sponsors that help contribute to making this contest happen!

Check out the trailer to see just a glimpse of the action that will be going down!

 

Contest Details

Registration is now open. Sign up in person at Ambush Board Co.

March Radness Skate Contest
March 15, 2014 at Kennesaw Skatepark
Check in at 10:00 am/Contest starts at 11:00 am
Two Divisions:
Street Contest and Pool Jam
$15 Entry Fee per Division (includes free contest tee shirt)
$250 Cash for 1st Place/Tons of Prizes for 2nd and 3rd Place

Street Contest Info:
-64 skaters max. Register in advance at Ambush Board Co.
-Jam session format for prelims and semifinals. Four skaters per jam. Jams are 4 minutes in length. Top skater moves on to the next round.
-Individual skate for finals. Each finalist will get two 1-minute runs (alternating between skaters).

Pool Jam Info:
-32 skaters max. Register in advance at Ambush Board Co.
-Prelims and semifinals feature four skaters per jam. Each skater gets two 45-second runs (alternating between skaters). Top skater moves on to the next round.
-Finals pits top two skaters going head to head for 10 minutes (alternating between skaters).

 

 

 

 

Ambush Mini Riot Presented by Red Bull – Full Recap

Screen Shot 2014-01-27 at 12.52.40 PMPeak retail season is over. The hard work is done and Mazza Mondays are back in full force. There is no better way to start off 2014 than with an awesome mini ramp contest! Early morning yawns and 30 degree weather aren’t enough to stop skateboarders from coming out to compete for $500 bucks! Huge thanks to Red Bull for putting the contest together and Jonah Owings from Hazard County Skatepark  for constructing a flawless mini ramp!

This is how the contest worked: two divisions (Cruisers and Shredders), 32 skaters in each division, 4 man heats with each rider getting two 45 second runs, and the best one advances. Second place winners earned $250 cash and first place winners earned $500 cash! People from all over came out to compete for that big purse money. Huge thanks to all the people and companies that came out to support the contest. This was probably one of my favorite contests that was have hosted so far. Well that’s enough rambling from me. I’ll let the photos do the rest of the talking!

Big congrats to the Cruisers Division winners Matt Hudson (1st) and Chris Colmenero (2nd) and the Shredders Division winners Gage Gum (1st) and Trey Abad a.k.a. CatNip (2nd).

Jona from Hazard County Skatepark did an awesome job on the ramp!

Jonah from Hazard County Skatepark did an awesome job on the ramp!

Aerial view of the action! Big thanks to RedBull for making this event happen!

Aerial view of the action! Big thanks to RedBull for making this event happen!

Left to right Jeremiah Babb, Anthony Hall, and Jordan Smith

The judges from left to right:
Jeremiah Babb, Anthony Hall, and Jordan Smith.

Our RedBull rep is tight!

The RedBull MXT Driver is tight!

These boys are always supporting Ambush! They are RAD!

These boys are always supporting Ambush! They are RAD! Ignore the mall grabbing. HaHa.

Ambush Team Rider Josh Butler FS tailslide rocking the Party With Ambush Tee

Ambush Team Rider Josh Butler FS tail slide rockin’ the Party With Ambush Tee.

Chris Coffman contemplating life

Chris Coffman contemplating life.

First place Shredders division Gage Johns with a big ol air fakie

Shredders division first place winner Gage Gum with a big ol air fakie

Chris Coffman FS TailGrab

Chris Coffman FS tailGrab

The Legend Stormy Pruett the MC for the day.

The Legend Stormy Pruett the MC for the day.

Max Yoder behind the lens shooting the video! Be looking out for the video recap in the very near future!

Max Yoder behind the lens shooting the video! Be looking out for the video recap in the very near future!

Zion 5oh slashing across reppin a Ambush Fiend Club deck

Zion 5oh slashing across reppin a Ambush Fiend Club deck

Shredders division winner Gage Johns did it all with a broken board!

Shredders division winner Gage Gum did it all with a broken board!

Shredders Division 2nd place CatNip with a huge FS melon

Shredders Division 2nd place CatNip with a huge FS melon

 

Big thanks to Big John holdin' it down in the shop!

Big thanks to Big John holdin it down in the shop!

 

Stormy and Wes trying to survive in the cold.

Stormy and Wes trying to survive in the cold.

 

little man big air on the extension

Little man; big air on the extension.

Reggie kelly

Reggie Kelly

Gage stoked he can finally pay his rent after being 2 months late. Catnip well he still has nothing to pay for. Thats all for the pics now

Gage stoked he can finally pay his rent after being 2 months late. Catnip. Well he still has nothing to pay for. ..

 

Big thanks to the Red Bull ATL crew

Air'n out

Air’n out

Flex'n in the new Ambush Premium Jaeger Jacket.

Tail Stall

Tail stall.

Ain't no party like an Ambush Board Co. Party

Ain’t no party like an Ambush Board Co. Party

Monochromatic Nip

Monochromatic Nip

Squirm with the blunt stall

Squirm with the blunt stall.

Backside 50/50

Backside 50/50

More from Catnip. Rock N Roll

Tray Abad at the AMbush Mini Riot in Kennesaw GA Red Bull

STOKED.

More about the Ambush Mini Riot Presented by Red Bull

Subscribe to the Ambush Board Co. on YouTube *recap video coming soon

Skateboarding in Puerto Rico

Skateboarding is a world wide community, especially in today’s highly connected internet age.  Lee recently brought to my attention a young filmer named Ian from Puerto Rico, looking to be a part of the Ambush family.  Check the clip below!

It’s clear by the footage that skaters in Puerto Rico are killing it, and we would love to include Ian and his crew in what we do here at the Ambush.  Were gonna hook up Ian with some Ambush goods, and hopefully we will cross paths sometime in the future!

Racked – Back 2 Basics

For this outfit we kept it classy with traditional blues, soft grays, and a bit of red for contrast. The result is a sophisticated look suitable for almost any occasion. Whether you’re in class, at the skatepark, or in the middle of a six-hour GTA 5 marathon, these threads are a sure shot.

Back 2 Basics

Available in-store and onlineLevis 504 Regular Straight Fit Jean ($78) Habitat Garcia Shoe ($65) Volcom Flug Belt ($22) RVCA That’ll Do Oxford LS ($54) Glassy Mike Mo Sunglasses ($30) Altamont Cottonwood Camp Hat ($28) Nixon Quad Watch ($100)

Memory Lane with Jordan Smith

Yes, those are skin tight white pants, and that is what Old 4th Ward park looked like before it was turned into a sanctioned skate zone.  Take a look back with Ambush rider Jordan Smith and his part from the 2008 video, SEC 2: SEC Strikes Back.  Learn more about the spots he misses, denial of his ginger heritage, and other poor fashion choices in the first installment of Memory Lane.

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