Credit Where Credit Is Due

The full-length skate video has gone the way of the dodo more or less and without beating a dead horse I’d like to delve ever so lightly into one aspect I miss about full feature videos: the credits or after credits sections.  Obviously, the intent of the credits is to acknowledge everyone who made the video possible, but they often serve as a platform for great B-roll footage and music.  So, I’d like to take some time and give credit where credit is due for my favorite skate video outros.

Coliseum’s PJ Ladd’s Wonderful Horrible Life (2002)

Every skateboarder has that one video they’ll attribute to making the biggest impression on them.  From what they skate, where they skate and even down to what skate shoes they skate.  For us old enough, more than likely you’ll remember that one video specifically because you wore the tape down from rewinding it constantly, eventually killing the tape.  I believe it’s safe to say for the majority of my peers and I that video was Coliseum Skateshop’s PJ Ladd’s Wonderful Horrible Life.  I challenge anyone to name a shop video that has had near the impact of this video.  Think about it, breakout parts from future pros; PJ Ladd, Ryan Gallant, and our introduction to the infamous Jereme Rogers.  Plain and simple, this video is my generation’s Mouse. This video made me want to skate nothing but éS Accels.

So what about PJ Ladd’s WHL’s credits/outro make it so memorable?  Well, mainly it features a lot of shenanigans and still serves as the biggest glimpse into the PJ’s enigmatic life to date.  Top it all off with a splash of Britpop and a clip of someone focusing a complete skateboard at a mall shop and you have a real winner.  Thanks, PJ.  That little blue cassette will forever have a special home in our hearts and VCRs.

 

 

Plan B’s Virtual Reality (1993)

Admittedly, I am too young to have seen this video when it came out.  However, I was lucky enough to score all four of the original Plan B videos (Questionable, Virtual Reality, Second Hand Smoke and The Revolution) on VHS in the early ’00s.  Needless to say, I have spent countless hours carefully dissecting each and every original Plan B video to the point it may be considered unhealthy.  A lot of Virtual Reality is burned into my memory; the Blind section, Mike Caroll’s line at the Gold Rail in DC, but I think the credits may take the cake as my favorite ever.  The field recording of the homeless man playing “Here comes the sun” is so sick, I can’t write anything about it that would do it justice. Just watch it here:

 

 

Antisocial’s Self-Titled Video (2004)

During my more formative years, it seemed as though our neighbors to the North could do no wrong.  Canada was setting the benchmark high for skateboard culture.   This can be attributed to an output of amazing independent videos and vibrant skate scenes.  Side note: they even stealthily snuck in a SOTY award in there, too.  When examining early ’00s Canadian skateboarding, please don’t let Mark Appleyard’s accolades  overshadow what I believe is an incredibly important shop video.  Antisocial’s self-titled video, featured stellar parts from Keegan Sauder, Quinn Starr, and last but not least, a Rick McCrank part that features a couple really underrated switch flips.  This video’s music direction really is second to none and I applaud Antisocial for my introduction to the Pogues and Magnolia Electric Co.  Here is the credit section to their first video:

 

 

P.S.  We are really excited to see their new flick come spring ’16.

 

 

Matt Creasy and Ryan Dearth’s Rusty Trombone (’02-ish)

More than likely, if you aren’t from the Southeast you probably haven’t seen this video.  If you have, well, good on you because it’s a classic.  Featuring parts from the likes of Jeremiah Babb, Chris Head, Mike Devine, John Sheffield, Mike Summers, Graham Bickerstaff, and Phil Kent, this video was one of my first glimpses into the driving forces in Atlanta street skating.  I’ll never forget buying a copy of Rusty Trombone.  I was at a skatepark in Cumming, GA, called “Wicked Grind” when they got a box of copies and an employee  immediately put one into the shop’s VCR.  Needless to say, I was stoked and bought it then proceeded to watch it countless times.  It’ll always be a very important video to me because it made me realize that there are local skateboarders out there making videos and contributing to skateboarding.  I always got stoked on the credits because they probably introduced me to Bright Eyes with their track “Let’s Not Shit Ourselves (To Love and to Be Loved)” wrapping up the video.

This video inspired me to skate and film skateboarding with my friends.

 

 

Habitat’s Mosaic (2003)

I probably sound like a broken records but I’ll say it one last time…this video is a CLASSIC.  I can’t think of a negative thing to say about this video.  What isn’t to love?  You get aesthetically pleasing art direction plus great music, and let’s not forget about the video’s lineup; Tim O’Connor and Wenning, Fred Gall, Rob Pluhowski, Ed Selego, Kerry Getz, Heath Kirchart, Jason Dill, Pappalardo, Stefan Janoski, Danny Garcia, and our introduction to Danny Renaud (The Dirt) whose part is arguably one of the best from the ’00s.

The credits for Mosaic always stood out with it’s mix of 8 mm footage, VX footage, and still photography.  Also, it ends with The Dirt tying a little kid’s shoes, how’s that for heartwarming!  Kudos, Habitat.  That white VHS cassette is as good as gold to me.

 

 

Upon writing this, I’m realizing that almost all of these videos excluding Plan B’s Virtual Reality are from generally the same era.  I definitely attribute this to the time of my life when I was the most impressionable and at the time everything seemed incredibly fresh.  So a lot of nostalgia is generated when I look back on these segments.  Hopefully, skateboarding’s collective attention span isn’t too narrow these days to appreciate the credits!

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