Skate

Emerica Made Chapter Two Premiere

 

Anticipation had been building up for two to three years with thoughts of what Emerica’s Made Chapter Two would bring. The excitement managed to keep a steady underlying role throughout the years, but broke through in the newest “The Skateboard Mag” issue with Andrew Reynolds on the cover. The issue contained bittersweet spoilers, but overall it provided stoke and insight to what we can expect from the follow up of the video series “Made” by Jon Miner.

 

Shortly after reading the November ’16 issue, I found out that Ambush and Ruin would be premiering the video at The Plaza Theatre in downtown Atlanta. My buddy Andy and I could not have been more excited. As the days went by, more and more information about the video was slowly beginning to get leaked out, and surprises helped bring the stoke level to new heights.

 

Emerica has made their mark in skateboarding by trying to show it in it’s simplest form. No crazy special effects, no pointless unrelated b-roll, and no ridiculous new age rap songs. Just skateboarding. They get straight to the point giving the viewer just what they want.

 

Safe to say the video did not disappoint. Jon Dickson opened the video with a smoking “welcome to the team” part leading into a Reynolds and Herman shared part. Following were some of Emerica’s Euro crew, riders that I hadn’t ever hear of before, but I am so glad that I learned. There was a classic Jerry Hsu part, and a come back of all come back parts by Kevin “Spanky” Long. Brandon Westgate, Jeremy Leabres, and Leo Romero had a very creative shared part, and Justin “Figgy” Figueroa ended the video with a barrage of gnarliness. Figgy is definitely “SOTY” material. His commitment and fearlessness is true inspiration.

 

The video brought more than just bangers; it also had great variety. From Collin Provost’s hard charging transition influenced style, to Spanky surfing wild steep bank and wall tricks. Also, the soundtrack reminded me a lot of the original “Made”. There was never a point where you felt like it was monotonous. It was interesting to see how Miner has connected the dots. Will he choose to continue the saga or not? Either way, Made Chapter Two in Atlanta was a complete success. Skateboarders of all ages were influenced and inspired, and to me, that is what skate videos are all about.

The video will be available for download on iTunes on Oct. 4!

Go skate!

Nerding Out: Thrasher Magazine Covers over the Years Pt. 1

Bi-weekly, we get together for a marketing meeting.  During these powwows, we lay out our marketing schedule and agenda, and discuss content.  A LOT of times during these meetings we sit around figuratively throwing shit at a wall and hoping some of it sticks.  A few months ago, sitting around the conference table discussing our marketing plans, it hit me.  That little voice in my head said, “Hey, Ben!  I don’t think anyone has ever analyzed every Thrasher Magazine cover.”  And…without thinking, I immediately blurted this out to the group.  Little did I know that this idea would stick and I’d be the one to undertake this endeavor.

Have you ever bitten off more than you can chew?  Ever taken a bite so large you instantly regret it?  We’ve all done it, and after nearly asphyxiating, we say, “Never again!  From now on, I’m only taking small bites.,” but…if you’re like me, your eyes are always bigger than your stomach, and after surviving that first enormous bite, all you know to do is settle in for the feast.

As of today Monday, August 22nd, Thrasher Magazine has published at least 440 different covers (including bonus and collector issues).  Obviously, it’s an incredibly big undertaking to catalog every cover, a task made larger by observing the following data points: year, month, skater(s), stance, trick, regular/switch, fakie, nollie, terrain (street or transition), shoe brand (if identifiable), and photographer or artist.
I’m not complaining, though, because as a skateboarder, actually, “Skatenerd,” I couldn’t think of a more fun project.  Since there is so much information to digest, I have decided to split this article up into segments, starting with the beginning; 1981-1992.  Part Two (1993-2005) will be coming out in the next few weeks.  Enjoy!

 

All Covers 1981-1992

Every Thrasher Cover from Jan 1981-Dec 1992

From Illustrations, Black & White, and into Full Color: Thrasher’s Evolution from 1981 to 1992

Based on covers alone, it’s almost inarguable that Thrasher’s biggest evolution took place during this era.  From the very first cover illustrated by Kevin Thatcher, to the last time a manual or “wheelie” variation graced the cover (Andy Kessler, June 1983), The Mag saw it all.  Every discipline was covered; backyard pools, vert, downhill races, freestyle, luge, and even some snowboarding.  Most notably during this time, skateboarding moved from the backyard pools and ramps into the streets and even some kitchens (Steve Rocco, December 1981).

Terrain:

Above is the aforementioned photo of Rocco taking it to the fridge.  By the end of this period, street skateboarding would fully take over and audiences would see less transition and almost no freestyle on the covers.  At the end of this period, Mike Carroll lands his first cover of The Mag in December 1992 (pictured above).  It would be around this time that Mike Carroll and Rick Howard would depart from Plan B, which was under World Industries (owned by Rocco).  Looking at the period this way definitely illustrates the changing of the guard that was happening at this time.

 

Graph of Terrain 81-92

Thrasher Covers by Terrain, ’81-’92

Trick Orientation:

By today’s standards, skateboarding fakie, switch, or nollie is so common that it comes as a surprise to view the breakdown of trick orientation through this period.  This graph doesn’t mean that people weren’t skating switch, fakie, or nollie, it just wasn’t making the covers.  For this discussion, the term “regular” doesn’t mean left foot forward, rather it means skating your natural stance.

 

Trick orientation graph

 

From 1981 to 1992, there were only six covers that featured tricks done by the rider skateboarding fakie.  Everything else was done regular or is not applicable, meaning the cover was a portrait, illustration, or featured a neutral trick (e.g. hanging ten, nose wheelies, pogos, or luge).  It wouldn’t be until the next era, ’93-’05, where covers become more diverse by trick orientation.  It’s safe to say that, during this period, #switchgod didn’t apply to Thrasher covers.

 

Skateboard Stance (Goofy vs. Regular):

Goofy vs. regular is a timeless battle, and the debate continues to this day as to which stance is superior.  I skateboard goofy-footed, so I’m always gonna hold it down for my goofy brothas.  Let’s see who wins the debate in this era.

 

Goofy vs. Regular Thrasher Magazine Graph

Damn! We gotta step it up, goofy footers. I’ll check you 1993-2005

Photographers:

As you can see below,  a lot of photographers received cover credits or partial credits (inserts) within this period.  I was hyped to sit down and look at this era and determine who was the most prolific. Mofo was by far the most prolific leaving the closest in numbers, Kevin Thatcher in the dust.

 

While trying to stomach all of the photos, riders, photographer credits, etc., an observer would have had been utterly OBLIVIOUS not to spot that, in December 1982, the cover featuring Tom Groholski crushing a huge backside air was shot by Groholski.  This is peculiar because, in today’s age of “selfieness,” there are a ton of photos and videos credited to the riders themselves, however, this photo was from 1982.  Who is shot it?  Was it Tom himself?  I figured it was Tom’s brother, but I was stoked to learn that it was, indeed, his father.  Jeff Grosso covers this in his web series “Grosso’s Loveletters to Skateboarding,” supported by Vans:

 

Outside of this particular instance, I don’t think we’ll ever see another cover shot by the rider’s own father.  Now that’s #legendary!  This tidbit, along with the fact that several prolific skateboard photographers also graced the cover of Thrasher Magazine shredding, makes this period my favorite.  We’ve seen that happen now with guys like Arto Saari, but it originally happened with Bryce Kanights and Luke Ogden both on covers skating and from behind the lens.

Featured Skateboarders:

Now, not every cover within this period featured just a single photo. Many covers had multiple inserts and could have several riders featured per photo, so there was A LOT to take in. With that being said, Steve Cab popped up on the cover of Thrasher in some form or fashion eight times during the first 12 years!

Here are all of Cab’s covers within this time period in order from top left to bottom right:

One of my favorite covers from this time would have to be the May, 1992 issue of Thrasher. It features John Montessi and Tom Knox and exclaims “DAMN IT ALL – SWITCHSTANCE” but neither Montessi’s or Knox’s tricks are switch.  The first cover featuring a switch trick wouldn’t come for at least another year but I’ll get to that and go deeper into tricks in the next episode. I’m exhausted thinking about it but I’ll get to it, promise.

May, 1992 Thrasher Cover

Photos: Thatcher, Sleeper

Till next time..

Skate & Educate: An interview with Keegan Guizard from Collegiate Skate Tour

For a few years now, you may have noticed that from time to time we share or post content related to a contest series known as the Collegiate Skate Tour. The series is an outlet for it’s creator, Keegan Guizard, to share his passion for skateboarding, higher education, and travel. Now in it’s fourth year, the Tour is better than ever, and Keegan is continuing to expand it through hard work and determination. So I thought it’d be rad to catch up with Keegan to discuss it. Enjoy.

CST think tank

Photo: @gillhormel

Let’s start with the basics; name, age, how long have you been skateboarding? Got any footage?

Keegan Guizard, 26. Been skating for 18 years this winter. I don’t really have any footage compiled. Just tricks in video promos and “friends” sections here & there.. And Instagram clips floating around.

Current set-up?

8.25″ Element Maders Apse deck. Independent classic 149s, Bones STF 54mm, Bones Reds, Diamond Grip and Hardware

How did you get into skateboarding?

In early elementary school, I thought it was really cool. My friend’s older brother had a board in their garage, and I used to ride it in their driveway. I liked it more and more every time. My dad got me my first board for getting honor roll in the third grade.

What college did you go to in North Carolina? When did you graduate?

I went to NC State University, home of the Wolfpack. Graduated in December, 2012.

I’ve been a fan of North Carolina skateboarding for forever. Early Post22 videos always got me hyped. Seeing that North Carolina has a produced tons of professional skateboarders and has a rich skateboard history. Who are some of your favorites from NC?

Glad you know what’s up! Post22 is the truth, especially in Raleigh where I lived for eight years. I’ll stick to those I actually got to skate with in North Carolina. Getting to skate around Justin Brock before he really blew up was tight. Dan Murphy, fellow NC State grad! Chet Childress is a real OG from my hometown. Brett Abramsky gets me hyped. Durand Beasley for the ramp session hype. Sturgil Horn for the party hype. Connor Champion rips.

Any up and comers to look out for from NC?

There’s so much young talent in NC. I hope they all keep it up! Will Smith has crazy natural talent. Isaac White is fun to watch. Alec Chambers just moved to New York, but he’s sick! Gary Bolos is in SD now; he’s ripping everything.

I heard you lived at an incubator? How was that? Is that where you came up with Collegiate Skate Tour and how long have you been operating it?

Yeah, I lived at this accelerator in Raleigh for a little while, called ThinkHouse. It’s a place where entrepreneurs live together, help each other and get help from local serial entrepreneurs and co-working spaces. It was a really sick place to be around really smart and very cool people. I can’t say enough about Raleigh, North Carolina either. In so many ways, it’s a great place to be. Collegiate Skate Tour first came up before that, when I was still finishing school. ThinkHouse was a great place to live and be when growing my company, and the Tour’s been in existence for about four years now.

At one point I believe you worked with Rob Mendieta at Collegiate Wake Tour? How did that come about and do the two tours have any affiliation?

When I was in school and my friends and I were running the NC State Skate Club (NC Skate), we were invited to an intercollegiate event in Jacksonville, FL. It was a great time and a great trip. When the next year came around, I tried to contact the guys running the event, but no one was doing anything to continue it. So someone sent me over to Rob Mendieta. He’s been a good source of help and advice, since he’s been doing college wake boarding events for about nine years now. Our first ever event, we collaborated with his wake boarding tour, but we haven’t done an event together since. We still stay in touch; we just don’t organize skate & wake events together. Yet… We’re both doing well, and Rob’s a good dude.

So far what’s your most memorable Collegiate Skate Tour Moment?

That’s a tough one. There are so many moments and so many trips that have been really epic in different ways. 1. Early on, when the Tour was still very young, almost every trip overlapped with an NC Skate group trip, so all the homies came out. Early trips, from NC to FL, were the funnest times and some of the best skate trips ever. We’d mob out to Tampa or Cocoa Beach and have a great time.

Working in skateboarding and traveling for work has allowed me to get out west a lot and eventually move to California. That’s been an invaluable experience. Even though I love the east coast, it’s been great to get to know the other side of the country, settle in SoCal (for now), and see a lot of the Northwest.

I can’t decide between early trips from NC or currently being in CA, but I’m super grateful for all of it.

Photo: @collegiateskate

Queens, NY Collegiate Skate Tour Stop Photo: @collegiateskate

What is CST about and what are your goals for the Tour? Any events you’d like to add or different cities?

Collegiate Skate Tour is a national contest series and organization for college skateboarding. We encourage higher education for skateboarders everywhere. We’ve done this mostly through our event series, putting together contests in New Hampshire, Kentucky, Georgia, South Carolina, and lots of other places in the US. Right now, we’re focused on our big events in Oregon, New York, California and Florida. I’m pumped that we’re becoming a nonprofit now, so that we can get college scholarships going for skaters! We’ll have scholarship money for contest winners, and also there will be standard merit-based scholarships though the Tour. I’m super hyped on where we’re at, and we should have college scholarships available through Collegiate Skate Tour for skaters sometime in 2017… Stay tuned.

connect and compete workshop

Collegiate Skate Tour “Connect and Compete” Pannel Photo @collegiateskate

Thoughts on skateboarding in the Olympics?

Any popular past time that can be made competitive will be highlighted in a competitive setting. There will always be people that make that happen. I mean, there’s Street League, there’s the Dime Glory Challenge, there are the smaller local contest events and even the college skate contests that we put on. Skateboarding just got popular enough for long enough to make it to that stage, where it’s been considered for (and accepted into) the Olympics. I understand why people are bummed, and I understand why other people are hyped. Lots of us (mid-20s and older) grew up with a skateboarding that took us out of the box and gave us something unique and creative to pursue. Skateboarding didn’t used to be cool, and I think that’s why the first godfathers are so cool now – they truly did something different. But we have to see it from others’ perspectives. Some dudes from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and poorer countries got saved from the streets by skating the streets. And a Street League berth, a contest prize purse, and the bragging rights of winning championships are all things that they should rightfully be proud of. Tiago Lemos right now… just as an example. That dude rips! And he’s not turning down any opportunities – I understand that. Skating in the Olympics, for a lot of dudes, is winning the game. Coming up from the streets and becoming a champion. Skateboarding is different things to different people, and those that dig a Sunday slappy session aren’t gonna lose that because of the Olympics. In fact, I’m one of those people. Skateboarders aren’t losing anything by the its inclusion in the Olympics. The contest scene skaters are getting greater opportunities because of it, and the raw street skaters might not get kicked out as much because of it. Whatever you like to do, do it.

Since being a part of NC State Skate Club and setting up the Tour what are some other clubs/schools killing it?

It’s rad to see certain schools stepping it up, in terms of skateboarding. NC State had a really solid club and crew when I was in Raleigh. All over Florida, there are legit skate clubs: UF (Gainesville), UCF (Orlando) & USF (Tampa) to name a few… The University of Southern California even has an undergrad course for skating! It’s called “Skateboarding and Action Sports in Business, Media & Culture,” and my friend Neftalie Williams teaches it. I’d have been so hyped to have that class to earn credits in school!

Hahaha, me too! I would have been all over that class. Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions, Keegan!

Be sure to keep up to date with the Tour through CST’s Website, Instagram, or Facebook.

Upcoming Collegiate Skate Tour Stops

Queens, NY @ Astoria Skatepark on October 8th, 2016

Carlsbad, CA @ Transworld Headquarters on November 12th, 2016

Gainesville, FL @ FreeRide Surf & Skate on February 25h, 2017

Eugene, OR @ Revered WJ Skatepark on May 20th, 2017

Skateboard Camp with Ambush Board Co.

When you’re a kid…summer is the best!  No school means sleeping in and having plenty of time to catch up on non-scholarly pursuits.  Whether it’s playing video games, watching TV or going to skateboard camp, it’s easily every kid’s favorite time of the year.  However, today is July 15th…and, with July almost being half over, most kids in the metro Atlanta are will be back in school in a couple weeks.  With that being said, one of our favorite things about summer is being able to host a skateboard camp at Swift-Cantrell through the city of Kennesaw.  What skateboarder doesn’t enjoy sharing the love of skateboarding with the next generation of rippers?

The camp has been going strong for a few summers now and it’s great to see some of shop’s riders braving the heat to teach. Not only are the campers stoked to learn the basics of skating but equally they are excited to learn about the culture. Here’s a glimpse into life as a camper:

Also, since camp is so awesome, I wanted to get some perspective on the camp from the instructors on what they love and hate about camp.

Bobby Henson

  ollie at foundation

The best part about skate camp is the kids and how fast they progress. It blows my mind every week how new and clueless most of the kids are to skateboarding and how by the end of the week they know how to do all the basics and even a few tricks. Some of the best highlights are the different ways each kid celebrates when they do something new and have been trying to learn for a awhile, that they never thought they would ever land. For example, one camper always wanted to drop in on a quarter pipe and once he landed one and rolled away he just screamed, with his hands doing rock on fist in the air. 

Wesley Lembo

backside smith grind

Skate Camp is awesome because my friends and I get the opportunity to literally cultivate the upcoming generation of skateboarders. I love getting to be hands on with each kid, and try to push them to try things that they maybe never thought they could do. The worst part is the heat. Everybody feels it, but I love just encouraging everyone to stay hydrated, to drink water, and to work at their own pace. Every kid is unique, and can offer something different to the camp experience. Between seeing new faces and old from week to week. I can easily say that skate camp is one of my favorite things that I get to be a part of.

Skyler Clark

kickflip over rail

Teaching skate camp at Swift Cantrell park has been a blast for me. It gives me a nostalgic feeling from when i was younger going to Progressive Skate Park camps in canton. Most of the kids that enroll genuinely want to learn and keep skating after the camp is done. I’d have to say the best part about skate camp is running into the kids later on and seeing how much they’ve progressed since the last time you skated with them. It makes you feel like you’ve made a positive difference in they’re life. A lot of cool kids have come through and even a few teenagers. No matter how old they are, it’s always awesome to see kids slam super hard and get right back up to try again. That’s what skating is all about. It’s about pushing yourself just over your comfort level and seeing what you’re really capable of. There have been many memorable moments during the time we’ve been doing the camps but honestly the most memorable ones are when they finally land what they’ve been working on and realize that as long as you want it you can do anything.

Now i can only name a couple of downsides to skate camp. Obviously the summer heat would take the energy out of most people, but for some reason it feels like the heat is magnified at that park haha.

The only other thing that kind of ticks me off is when parents sign they’re kids up just to get them out of the house. I get it. You don’t want your kid to be a couch potato, but that doesn’t mean skateboarding is what they want to do. Skating involves repeatedly slamming, getting back up and trying again. I feel like skateboarding is for athletic people who don’t quite fit into or don’t wanna be involved in other sports. So when a kid shows up and clearly has no intention on trying and acts like they’re being forced into it, its a bummer. Either way, we try to stoke them up as much as we can but in the end, it all depends on how much they want it.

5 Skaters with Extracurricular Interests

The world of skateboarding is incredibly vast and fast moving.  Its influence is felt in the music we listen to, the art we look at, and the movies we watch. Skateboarding has always attracted a creative class, but some skaters have interests that completely transcend the world of skateboarding. As skateboarders, we have an ability to blend in while also standing out.  We appreciate all the different walks of life that one can encounter, so it comes as no surprise that top tier pros have found interest in so many numerous things.  Everyone on this list is still out there ripping, while also redefining what it means to be a skateboarder.

5. Eric Koston

eric-koston-frontside-feeble-nyc

Koston has been in the game a long time now, and still makes waves through the skateboarding community. He popularized being a well rounded street skater, being one of the first guys to take switch skating to both a manual pad and handrails. But, between nollie heelflip nosesliding Wilshire ten, and doing a tuck knee air out, he found the time to pick up a golf habit. As a matter of fact, Koston’s not alone on this one, it would seem a lot of fine people under the Crailtap banner have followed suit. He’s also a self professed sneaker head, stacking up a huge collection over the years. He love Jordans so much, his third shoe on es was a dead ringer of the Jordan 12. Nike proved a good fit for Koston, and has helped in developing tech skate shoes that still have a classic fit and function. Stay Frosty fools.

Here’s this:

 

4. Mark Suciu

mark suciu

Mark Suciu is the Houdini of skateboarding. He’s a straight up contortionist, and can dislocate his hips to revert out of anything, as he showed when he shocked the skateboarding community with his breakout Cross Continental part. As of 2014, Mark has been enrolled as a full time student at Temple University, studying French literature. His schooling isn’t some James Franco stunt to prove he’s sophisticated. The dude is seriously intelligent. His Pro Spotlight interview in Transworld is filled with thoughtful, articulate responses, which are just reactions to questions asked by the interviewer. You have to actually digest what he’s saying to understand what he’s getting at. There’s gotta be a correlation to intellect and the insane kind of skateboarding that Mark does.

 

3. Jason Lee

J-Lee-hangtag

Hey! Remember My Name Is Earl? Jason Lee sure does, and before he was a fancy shmancy Hollywood actor, he was busy becoming a street skating legend. He had style, and his backside flips are holy, and he was even in the extremely venerable Video Days. He also co-owns Stereo Skateboards with Chris Pastras. Most outside of the skateboarding world recognize Jason Lee as the guy from Alvin and the Chipmunks, but we skateboarders know better! He was one of the few dudes in the 90’s who had fluidity and style, and with the birth of Stereo, paved a way for guys like Ethan Fowler, who rode for Stereo and had a killer part in A Visual Sound. He actually had a pretty cool start to his acting career, with his first staring role being in a Sonic Youth video. He also was friends with Clerks director, Kevin James and starred in his movie, Mall Rats. Jason Lee’s career has definitely been a weird, wild ride. Oh, he’s also like a scientologist or something.

 

2. Brandon Westgate

Brandon Westgate

Brandon Westgate is East Coast skateboarding. His skateboarding is powerful, fast, and as smooth as a bottle of Ocean Spray cranberry juice. Wait…What? For a dude as gnarly as Westgate, you wouldn’t expect him to be a cranberry farmer, but he totally is. Cranberry bogging is a family business for the Westgates, and his dad has been doing it since he was a kid. The crazy amount of pop he has is actually a result of trudging through the marshes since he was but a lad…That’s not really true, but it would explain a lot. The dude is a legend and has helped fuel the revival of the East Coast craze that is currently hogging all of your Instagram. Don’t lie, you love it!

  1. John Cardiel

Where to begin? Dude, it’s John Cardiel, he slays, there’s no other way to describe him. As most of you know, Cardiel was paralyzed while on tour in Australia when a trailer hit him and damaged his spinal cord. He was told he would never walk again, but as we all know, Cardiel said “Fawk that!” and started mountain biking! Biking actually played a huge role in his rehabilitation process, as it would loosen up the tight muscles in his legs. Of course, he pushes that to the limits, and goes as fast as he possibly can, as seen in Propeller. Cards is an inspiration to so many, watching him skate always gets you pumped, and you find yourself pushing ten times harder, slamming fifty times harder, and getting back up for more. All Hail Cardiel!!!!

Did you know he’s into reggae?

Skateboarders are a diverse bunch. There’s so much personality on and off the board, it really is crazy to see how it manifests itself. To me, the big guys in the community are so much more relatable when you see how human they are. They’re more than just skaters, they’re dudes just like you and me, who have families, hobbies, and responsibilities. At the end of the day, we all do what we do. I don’t know about you fools, but I’m gonna go skate. Peace.

 

 

 

Go Skateboarding Day 2016

The technological world is taking over. Our entertainment, our shopping, our communication, even our interactions among friends have become relegated to a flickering glow from a digital device. That’s why skateboarding is so special, whole, and pure. It can’t be done from a smartphone (unless you are playing True Skate, but how does that count?). Skateboarding is real. You do it in the natural world with genuine friends. You do it because it’s challenging. You do it because it’s fun. And, you do it because you love it. Skateboarding should be celebrated and that’s why we at Ambush fully embrace Go Skateboarding Day.

This year’s Go Skateboarding Day event at the Kennesaw Skatepark saw some killer skating, lots of camaraderie, and some of the gnarliest slams that park has ever seen (check out Spencer Ames’ Hall of Meat worthy backflip). Even the Mayor came out and donated some flesh to the skatepark. And, that’s what Go Skateboarding Day is all about: the whole community getting behind it and showing the world what we already knew: skateboarding is life.

Much thanks to the City of Kennesaw, Real, Anti-Hero, Spitfire, Thunder, Thrasher Magazine, and Red Bull for making this event fun.

Catching Up With The Crew

To me, it’s always seemed like getting footage is cyclical. Sometimes, it comes easy and the crew logs several minutes a week and then the next week, nothing. While the process can certainly feel tedious at times, it’s absolutely worth it. When there is enough footage to stitch something together, it doesn’t get much better than that! So it always gets me hyped to see anyone from our team putting out footage. No matter the format or platform.

Gary Backside Tailslide

Gary gets a back tail while Cole documents

With that being said, I wanted to compile the most recent clips our riders have been featured in and put them into one place. So sit back, watch, and get stoked to go skate with the homies and put out your own clips.

First off, we got Travis Glover skating through Spain with Chaz Ortiz in this clip for JBL Audio. Yo Travis! Let me get some headphones!

Next stop the whole crew put it down in our “Open” episode featured over at the RIDE Channel! Also sick to hear them use a Rad-isaurus Rex song. That ender! Mitch you are a madman!

Zeke, Nip, Skyler, and Travis crush it in Max Yoder’s video he put together for Thrasher Magazine. Good work boys!

Last but not least is the latest installment in Kyle Ford’s Dad Cam series which has a mix big mix of everyone.

Hopefully this gets everyone hyped to hit the streets and make their own flicks. Always hyped to see what everyone else has cookin.

Happy shredding!

#ambushunion

A Man’s Best Friend – Film by Marvin Siclait

A scene from Marvin's film "A Man's Best Friend".

 

It goes without saying that filming making and photography are integral parts of skateboarding. The task of filming or taking photos of your friends skating often acts as a conduit towards other creative endeavors. Recently our very own customer service wizard, Marvin Siclait put together a badass short film. I had no idea that Marvin makes shorts, nor, did I know he is in film school. With that I had to know more, check out his latest work and find out more about the filmmaker below.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Interview with Marvin:

First things first. How long have you been making skits and how’d you get into it?

I started making skits in the 8th grade and got really involved with film & video all throughout high school and now college.

How was the process of filming this? Did you have a storyboard or was it spontaneous?

Like with most video idea I find interesting, I sit down and script immediately. Then from there I come up with a shot sheet/ equipment list to get everything ready.

How did you come up with the concept?

I came up with the concept while walking around campus at GSU (Georgia State University). I saw a homeless man with an out of place dog leash coming from his trench coat. Before I knew it he pulled a board from his jacket and threw down while holding the leash for support. It kinda looked like he was tying to walk a dog and boom the idea clicked.

That’s rad! Sometimes inspiration comes at the weirdest times. Anything you’d change or do differently?

Yeah, if I had more time to shoot, I would have portrayed the board as more of a dog and also added a bit more skating.

Where do you go to film school and how far are you into school? Any post graduation goals?

I study film downtown at GSU and I have about a year left in the program.  Eventually I just want to make movies/films. It really more of a passion than a career for me.

Do you have any favorite people to work with or would like to work with?

Since being in school, I’ve shot a short film every summer and dudes at our shop like Skyler and John are always down to help me out. We’ve been friends for a while and all like making movies, so they’re kinda of my go to cast & crew.

What type of equipment did you use?

When shooting I like to be prepared, but i’m usually crunched for time, so I try to only bring the essentials. Since there was no audio, I only used a camera (Canon 5D) and tripod/stabilizer.

When can we expect the next video or is there anywhere people can see more of your works?

I’m working on a summer short film that Skyler and John from the shop will star in. The details on a premier are still being worked on right now, but we should be wrapped up before the summer is up. Also we’ll be putting out some more content for the shop, so anyone can look out on our social media channels for more!

Right on, Marvin! Thanks for the chat!

Format and Away Days Premieres

 

Video premiere season is upon us! Summertime doesn’t just mean great weather and short-shorts, and just to be clear, I’m not talking about chubbers (don’t worry Garrett you get a free pass). I’m talking about foxy chicks with nice legs. No summertime means that people put out full length videos that they’ve been busting their asses for. Over this past weekend we got to see two videos in two nights.

Ambush Format and Away Days Premieres

Friday night was a local video called “Format”, which was filmed by Carver Weeks and Austin Sneed. It featured parts from Will Gatewood, Ryan Gatewood, Dylan Stuckman, Solomon Mosley, Anthony Morales and Ben Hayes. Its always fun going to a local video premiere because you get to see people you don’t get to usually hang out with on a regular basis. Everyone is typically in a great mood and ready to party! Oh and did I mention that the premiere was at a bar in East Atlanta called the Graveyard? Cheap drinks and pool will always spice up the night of a vid, that is if you can get a turn on the pool table. Anyways, Format was great, hugs were given, beer was spilled and bad decisions were most likely made. Looking forward to the next local video to come out!

Adidas Away Days

On Saturday, the long awaited Adidas video “Away Days” premiered at the Plaza Theatre. Now this video has too many people to name here, but as long as you haven’t been under a rock for the past couple of months, you know the deal. Adidas rep, Bobby Boyd, was kind enough to have a VIP showing at 8:00 pm. Before the video started, there was a special thanks from Nakel Smith and Jake Donnelly to all the local Atlanta area skate shops such as Ambush, Ruin, Hazard County and Stratosphere. The video was insane and had the introduction of their newest pro riders, Daewon Song and Marc Johnson. There was some questionable music by my standards, but the skating was completely mind-blowing. It was great seeing our boy Bobby Henson tear it up as well! Wait…Ive just been told that it was actually Alec Majerus skating, not Bobby. Well, you could’ve fooled me.

Ambush Away Days Premiere

After the video, everyone was all smiles and ready to party! Most of us made our way over to El Myr, Little 5 Points’ local watering hole. Bobby Boyd hooked it up again with a major bar tab with quite a few drink tickets floating around. We all busted a fair amount of Grizzs and PBRs (If you’re ever in the L5P area, I strongly suggest you go by El Myr and catch a Grizz). As the night was winding down, we felt lucky there was only one fight (and it was among a few girls). They must have been arguing about whether or not MJ should’ve left Lakai for Adidas. Finally, we all crawled our way back to where we were staying, responsibly of course.

Adidas Away Days Premiere

Thanks to Bobby Boyd, Adidas, The Plaza Theatre and El Myr. We all had one hell of a time. This Thursday we get to live it up again at the Plaza for the new Volcom video “Holy Stokes”. And, if my calculations are correct, we are gonna have another insane night on our hands.

 

 

Save Big for Summer!

Summer is right around the bend and we couldn’t be any more stoked! Who doesn’t love a few extra hours of daylight? With longer days, you get more time on your board, subsequently, that also means more blown out shoes! Here’s a secret way to optimize your time and money this summer. Get your shoes now and you’ll get the most bang for your buck. Use that little extra dough saved for more important things like; beverages, LOTS of beverages, and BBQ. You might be asking yourself, “How can I save money on shoes?!” It’s easy, just take advantage of our Multi-Shoe Discount Program (discounts taken off at check-out): Buy 2 Pairs SAVE 10%, Buy 3 Pairs SAVE 15%, or Buy 4 or More Pairs and SAVE 20%.

Outside of that, the only thing left to do is shop.

Here are five shoes for under $59.99 that will help me save this summer!

Emerica Reynolds Low Vulc (White/Black) $59.99

Anything Andrew Reynolds put his name on is grade A. It’s no secret that Andrew Reynolds puts the capital “b” in the word “BOSS” so you already know his Emerica Low Vulc model is clutch too! Plus this white color way is definitely a good summer look.

Emerica Reynolds Low Vulc

Converse Cons Sumner (Black/Navy) $59.99

Still on the fence about the whole rubber toe-cap thing? Well at $59.99 you might as well test the waters with the Cons Sumner. A little toe-cap can go a LONG way.

sumner_blk_navy2_27

Vans Chima Ferguson Pro (Premium Tan/White) $48.99

I consider myself a Vans connoisseur and when I buy Vans I personally stick to the classics (Old Skool, Half Cab, Sk8-Hi, and Era) but the time has come to give the Ferguson pro a whirl. Maybe I’ll be able to stomp nollie heelflips like Chima in these, if not, at least I’ll still look fly.

fergusonpro_prem_tan_wht2_12

Lakai Marc Johnson Chocolate 20 Year (Black/Black Suede) $38.99

It doesn’t get much better than Marc Johnson’s latest shoe from Lakai. It’s low profile silhouette and minimal lace up design gives it that simple yet enticing look. Shoot to make this color way even better it celebrates Chocolate Skateboard’s 20th anniversary. In a world so bitter who couldn’t use a little extra Chocolate…am I right?

lakai_mj_blkblk_suede2_8

Etnies Marana (Dark Grey/White/Gum) $55.99

Looking for a successful, skate filled, summer? Well, you are going to need to keep your feet happy and you should probably add a ultra shock absorbent cupsole to your quiver. Look no further than Etnies Marana for the task, I mean have you seen what Chris Joslin does in these… Try a pair and get to hucking.

 

marana_darkgreywhitegum2

Now, that I am set on shoes for the immediate future, I only have to worry about one thing. That is what am I gonna spend the extra money I saved on? Maybe a new board, some gas, a round of drinks, or food? Maybe a combination of all of those? That’s up to you.

What shoes will you pick?

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