Assorted BS

Nerding Out: Thrasher Magazine Covers over the Years Pt. 1

Bi-weekly, we get together for a marketing meeting.  During these powwows, we lay out our marketing schedule and agenda, and discuss content.  A LOT of times during these meetings we sit around figuratively throwing shit at a wall and hoping some of it sticks.  A few months ago, sitting around the conference table discussing our marketing plans, it hit me.  That little voice in my head said, “Hey, Ben!  I don’t think anyone has ever analyzed every Thrasher Magazine cover.”  And…without thinking, I immediately blurted this out to the group.  Little did I know that this idea would stick and I’d be the one to undertake this endeavor.

Have you ever bitten off more than you can chew?  Ever taken a bite so large you instantly regret it?  We’ve all done it, and after nearly asphyxiating, we say, “Never again!  From now on, I’m only taking small bites.,” but…if you’re like me, your eyes are always bigger than your stomach, and after surviving that first enormous bite, all you know to do is settle in for the feast.

As of today Monday, August 22nd, Thrasher Magazine has published at least 440 different covers (including bonus and collector issues).  Obviously, it’s an incredibly big undertaking to catalog every cover, a task made larger by observing the following data points: year, month, skater(s), stance, trick, regular/switch, fakie, nollie, terrain (street or transition), shoe brand (if identifiable), and photographer or artist.
I’m not complaining, though, because as a skateboarder, actually, “Skatenerd,” I couldn’t think of a more fun project.  Since there is so much information to digest, I have decided to split this article up into segments, starting with the beginning; 1981-1992.  Part Two (1993-2005) will be coming out in the next few weeks.  Enjoy!


All Covers 1981-1992

Every Thrasher Cover from Jan 1981-Dec 1992

From Illustrations, Black & White, and into Full Color: Thrasher’s Evolution from 1981 to 1992

Based on covers alone, it’s almost inarguable that Thrasher’s biggest evolution took place during this era.  From the very first cover illustrated by Kevin Thatcher, to the last time a manual or “wheelie” variation graced the cover (Andy Kessler, June 1983), The Mag saw it all.  Every discipline was covered; backyard pools, vert, downhill races, freestyle, luge, and even some snowboarding.  Most notably during this time, skateboarding moved from the backyard pools and ramps into the streets and even some kitchens (Steve Rocco, December 1981).


Above is the aforementioned photo of Rocco taking it to the fridge.  By the end of this period, street skateboarding would fully take over and audiences would see less transition and almost no freestyle on the covers.  At the end of this period, Mike Carroll lands his first cover of The Mag in December 1992 (pictured above).  It would be around this time that Mike Carroll and Rick Howard would depart from Plan B, which was under World Industries (owned by Rocco).  Looking at the period this way definitely illustrates the changing of the guard that was happening at this time.


Graph of Terrain 81-92

Thrasher Covers by Terrain, ’81-’92

Trick Orientation:

By today’s standards, skateboarding fakie, switch, or nollie is so common that it comes as a surprise to view the breakdown of trick orientation through this period.  This graph doesn’t mean that people weren’t skating switch, fakie, or nollie, it just wasn’t making the covers.  For this discussion, the term “regular” doesn’t mean left foot forward, rather it means skating your natural stance.


Trick orientation graph


From 1981 to 1992, there were only six covers that featured tricks done by the rider skateboarding fakie.  Everything else was done regular or is not applicable, meaning the cover was a portrait, illustration, or featured a neutral trick (e.g. hanging ten, nose wheelies, pogos, or luge).  It wouldn’t be until the next era, ’93-’05, where covers become more diverse by trick orientation.  It’s safe to say that, during this period, #switchgod didn’t apply to Thrasher covers.


Skateboard Stance (Goofy vs. Regular):

Goofy vs. regular is a timeless battle, and the debate continues to this day as to which stance is superior.  I skateboard goofy-footed, so I’m always gonna hold it down for my goofy brothas.  Let’s see who wins the debate in this era.


Goofy vs. Regular Thrasher Magazine Graph

Damn! We gotta step it up, goofy footers. I’ll check you 1993-2005


As you can see below,  a lot of photographers received cover credits or partial credits (inserts) within this period.  I was hyped to sit down and look at this era and determine who was the most prolific. Mofo was by far the most prolific leaving the closest in numbers, Kevin Thatcher in the dust.


While trying to stomach all of the photos, riders, photographer credits, etc., an observer would have had been utterly OBLIVIOUS not to spot that, in December 1982, the cover featuring Tom Groholski crushing a huge backside air was shot by Groholski.  This is peculiar because, in today’s age of “selfieness,” there are a ton of photos and videos credited to the riders themselves, however, this photo was from 1982.  Who is shot it?  Was it Tom himself?  I figured it was Tom’s brother, but I was stoked to learn that it was, indeed, his father.  Jeff Grosso covers this in his web series “Grosso’s Loveletters to Skateboarding,” supported by Vans:


Outside of this particular instance, I don’t think we’ll ever see another cover shot by the rider’s own father.  Now that’s #legendary!  This tidbit, along with the fact that several prolific skateboard photographers also graced the cover of Thrasher Magazine shredding, makes this period my favorite.  We’ve seen that happen now with guys like Arto Saari, but it originally happened with Bryce Kanights and Luke Ogden both on covers skating and from behind the lens.

Featured Skateboarders:

Now, not every cover within this period featured just a single photo. Many covers had multiple inserts and could have several riders featured per photo, so there was A LOT to take in. With that being said, Steve Cab popped up on the cover of Thrasher in some form or fashion eight times during the first 12 years!

Here are all of Cab’s covers within this time period in order from top left to bottom right:

One of my favorite covers from this time would have to be the May, 1992 issue of Thrasher. It features John Montessi and Tom Knox and exclaims “DAMN IT ALL – SWITCHSTANCE” but neither Montessi’s or Knox’s tricks are switch.  The first cover featuring a switch trick wouldn’t come for at least another year but I’ll get to that and go deeper into tricks in the next episode. I’m exhausted thinking about it but I’ll get to it, promise.

May, 1992 Thrasher Cover

Photos: Thatcher, Sleeper

Till next time..

5 Skaters with Extracurricular Interests

The world of skateboarding is incredibly vast and fast moving.  Its influence is felt in the music we listen to, the art we look at, and the movies we watch. Skateboarding has always attracted a creative class, but some skaters have interests that completely transcend the world of skateboarding. As skateboarders, we have an ability to blend in while also standing out.  We appreciate all the different walks of life that one can encounter, so it comes as no surprise that top tier pros have found interest in so many numerous things.  Everyone on this list is still out there ripping, while also redefining what it means to be a skateboarder.

5. Eric Koston


Koston has been in the game a long time now, and still makes waves through the skateboarding community. He popularized being a well rounded street skater, being one of the first guys to take switch skating to both a manual pad and handrails. But, between nollie heelflip nosesliding Wilshire ten, and doing a tuck knee air out, he found the time to pick up a golf habit. As a matter of fact, Koston’s not alone on this one, it would seem a lot of fine people under the Crailtap banner have followed suit. He’s also a self professed sneaker head, stacking up a huge collection over the years. He love Jordans so much, his third shoe on es was a dead ringer of the Jordan 12. Nike proved a good fit for Koston, and has helped in developing tech skate shoes that still have a classic fit and function. Stay Frosty fools.

Here’s this:


4. Mark Suciu

mark suciu

Mark Suciu is the Houdini of skateboarding. He’s a straight up contortionist, and can dislocate his hips to revert out of anything, as he showed when he shocked the skateboarding community with his breakout Cross Continental part. As of 2014, Mark has been enrolled as a full time student at Temple University, studying French literature. His schooling isn’t some James Franco stunt to prove he’s sophisticated. The dude is seriously intelligent. His Pro Spotlight interview in Transworld is filled with thoughtful, articulate responses, which are just reactions to questions asked by the interviewer. You have to actually digest what he’s saying to understand what he’s getting at. There’s gotta be a correlation to intellect and the insane kind of skateboarding that Mark does.


3. Jason Lee


Hey! Remember My Name Is Earl? Jason Lee sure does, and before he was a fancy shmancy Hollywood actor, he was busy becoming a street skating legend. He had style, and his backside flips are holy, and he was even in the extremely venerable Video Days. He also co-owns Stereo Skateboards with Chris Pastras. Most outside of the skateboarding world recognize Jason Lee as the guy from Alvin and the Chipmunks, but we skateboarders know better! He was one of the few dudes in the 90’s who had fluidity and style, and with the birth of Stereo, paved a way for guys like Ethan Fowler, who rode for Stereo and had a killer part in A Visual Sound. He actually had a pretty cool start to his acting career, with his first staring role being in a Sonic Youth video. He also was friends with Clerks director, Kevin James and starred in his movie, Mall Rats. Jason Lee’s career has definitely been a weird, wild ride. Oh, he’s also like a scientologist or something.


2. Brandon Westgate

Brandon Westgate

Brandon Westgate is East Coast skateboarding. His skateboarding is powerful, fast, and as smooth as a bottle of Ocean Spray cranberry juice. Wait…What? For a dude as gnarly as Westgate, you wouldn’t expect him to be a cranberry farmer, but he totally is. Cranberry bogging is a family business for the Westgates, and his dad has been doing it since he was a kid. The crazy amount of pop he has is actually a result of trudging through the marshes since he was but a lad…That’s not really true, but it would explain a lot. The dude is a legend and has helped fuel the revival of the East Coast craze that is currently hogging all of your Instagram. Don’t lie, you love it!

  1. John Cardiel

Where to begin? Dude, it’s John Cardiel, he slays, there’s no other way to describe him. As most of you know, Cardiel was paralyzed while on tour in Australia when a trailer hit him and damaged his spinal cord. He was told he would never walk again, but as we all know, Cardiel said “Fawk that!” and started mountain biking! Biking actually played a huge role in his rehabilitation process, as it would loosen up the tight muscles in his legs. Of course, he pushes that to the limits, and goes as fast as he possibly can, as seen in Propeller. Cards is an inspiration to so many, watching him skate always gets you pumped, and you find yourself pushing ten times harder, slamming fifty times harder, and getting back up for more. All Hail Cardiel!!!!

Did you know he’s into reggae?

Skateboarders are a diverse bunch. There’s so much personality on and off the board, it really is crazy to see how it manifests itself. To me, the big guys in the community are so much more relatable when you see how human they are. They’re more than just skaters, they’re dudes just like you and me, who have families, hobbies, and responsibilities. At the end of the day, we all do what we do. I don’t know about you fools, but I’m gonna go skate. Peace.




Catching Up With The Crew

To me, it’s always seemed like getting footage is cyclical. Sometimes, it comes easy and the crew logs several minutes a week and then the next week, nothing. While the process can certainly feel tedious at times, it’s absolutely worth it. When there is enough footage to stitch something together, it doesn’t get much better than that! So it always gets me hyped to see anyone from our team putting out footage. No matter the format or platform.

Gary Backside Tailslide

Gary gets a back tail while Cole documents

With that being said, I wanted to compile the most recent clips our riders have been featured in and put them into one place. So sit back, watch, and get stoked to go skate with the homies and put out your own clips.

First off, we got Travis Glover skating through Spain with Chaz Ortiz in this clip for JBL Audio. Yo Travis! Let me get some headphones!

Next stop the whole crew put it down in our “Open” episode featured over at the RIDE Channel! Also sick to hear them use a Rad-isaurus Rex song. That ender! Mitch you are a madman!

Zeke, Nip, Skyler, and Travis crush it in Max Yoder’s video he put together for Thrasher Magazine. Good work boys!

Last but not least is the latest installment in Kyle Ford’s Dad Cam series which has a mix big mix of everyone.

Hopefully this gets everyone hyped to hit the streets and make their own flicks. Always hyped to see what everyone else has cookin.

Happy shredding!


Insane Terrain: Garfield High School

Here’s the scenario, for the past couple weeks every night you get home from work dead tired and ready for a solid night’s sleep. You lay in bed waiting for sleep to come but it doesn’t. You’re cursed! You are suffering from a certain compulsive vision and you can’t shake it long enough to put your mind at ease.  Most skateboarders can empathize with this because we all know the struggle of having trick stuck in our mind. Literally you can’t rest until you make your vision a reality. The spot is lined up and ready for the taking and, maybe even, you’ve already tried the trick. Regardless, you are stuck with the pain of bringing your thought into fruition. Finally the day arrives and you go out and bust. The thrill of riding away is what we all are searching for, unfortunately, for you, today, it’s short lived. You check the photo or footage and it doesn’t live up to your expectations. The trick was gnarly but nothing will do it justice no photo or clip. Nevertheless, people will figure out how gnarly the trick is by visiting the spot. You have left your mark and the madness continues to the next spot.

Looks are always deceiving and what sometimes looks insane isn’t and vice versa. Recently, I saw a new trick done on the famous bank to wall at Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington and it got me thinking…You don’t have worry about deceptive angles or anything at Garfield High because anything done on that wall or surrounding embankments is wild. I have never visited spot but it should be in Thrasher Magazine’s table book Insane Terrain if it isn’t.

Click around on Google street view for yourself…talk about a dream spot.

Screen Shot 2016-01-13 at 2.42.21 PM

Naturally there are a ton of options at Garfield and a ton of shit has gone down but here are some of my favorites that have gone down at the school. In no particular order.

Georgie Tsushima Wallie Bluntslide

If this trick doesn’t hit you like a sack of bricks then I don’t know what would. RIP, Georgie

All of Nolan Johnson’s tricks

Nolan looks like he just hopped a train and if I saw him out I’d imagine he would be better suited at busking for change rather than ripping, a true original. Hope to see more footage from him soon!



Backside Boneless

Erick Winkowski’s Invert

Erick Winkowski seems like he has been getting way more coverage recently than he ever did as a team rider for Welcome Skateboards. This invert at Garfield is a prime example of how gnarly this guy is. Also I recommend watching OJ Wheel’s recent tour video to Hawaii for more of Erick ripping.

Jordan Sanchez’s No Comply Boardslide

Jordan Sanchez has been killing it for forever and was one of our favorites on Boulevard. We couldn’t be more excited for his recent pro nod. Good looks, Welcome skateboards.

All of these clips get me hyped and hopefully someday I can do some skate tourism in Seattle, Washington and visit this #Insaneterrain . I leave this last tidbit  for all you music nerds out there, Jimi Hendrix went to Garfield High before he dropped out Junior year.



Five Reasons Why I Won’t Be Skateboarding Saturday

Unless you are lucky and get to skateboard for a living, the older you get, naturally, the less time you have to skateboard.  Priorities change from chasing the next session to chasing the next paycheck.  These are just the facts of life.

As aging adult skateboarders, after we’ve put in our 40-50+ hour work week you would think that we’d be excited to skate.  Well, that isn’t always the case.  I certainly can’t speak for all adult skateboarders, but here are my top five reasons I will not be skateboarding Saturday.


You know it, I know it, slams are very capable of extinguishing any desire to skateboard.  Why is that?  If I see someone eat shit, I’m not stoked, I’m done!  On the flipside of that, there are humans  who seemingly love to slam (think Leo Romero).  Whatever your stance is on slamming, I think we can all agree that seeing slams invariably sucks.  Sorry @hallofmeat but I had to unfollow 🙁


Maybe it’s a poor excuse but, come on, don’t act like after a long work week you don’t fancy a couple cold brews…or 15.  I find myself often letting my Friday nights ruin my Saturday sessions.  So let’s raise our glasses to waking up, turning the phone OFF, and not skating because we are too hungover!


Screen Shot 2016-01-07 at 12.21.55 PM

Whether it’s having a honey do list or your significant other has the day off, ladies have a real knack for putting an end to your session.  Not everyone falls victim to this.  A lot of skateboarders better halves are supportive of “skateboard time,” but let’s face it, we all have a friend who will pull the “ole lady” excuse 9 out of 10 times.



The older I get, the more expensive skateboarding gets, too.  Maybe it seems more expensive considering my finances are more restricted due to drinking and women (both are expensive).  However, I do remember a time when I could skate all Saturday on just a few dollars.  Grab enough cash to to chip in on gas and whatever is left goes towards the dollar menu.  Now, the post session meal typically involves a restaurant and drinks.  So let’s tack on 10 or 15 bucks on an already tight budget and staying home is looking nice.

Other Hobbies

As much as I love skateboarding, sometimes it’s nice to take a step back and focus on other activities.  Typically, I always end up appreciating skateboarding more and sometimes even skate better after a small break.  So, consider getting out of your comfort zone and learn something new on your next day off.  Trust me, you won’t lose your kickflips.

Ambush Alumni: Juston Tucker

The Ambush family strives to build and cultivate the local community and give people an opportunity to do what they love.  As stated in the previous Ambush Alumni post with Ryan Dearth, we have been so lucky to have such an amazing group of people come through our doors and work with us.  Allow us to introduce another one of them to you!

Juston Tucker

Juston Tucker (right) with fellow Ambush alum, Bobby Sattler (left)

Meet Juston Tucker.  Juston grew up 20 minutes from the shop in the Acworth area, and worked for us between 2000 and 2002.  Shortly after leaving Ambush, Juston moved to California and began working in the marketing deprtment for Podium Distribution.  Podium Distribution, at the time, was the home of DVS, Lakai and Matix.  Juston left marketing and now designs footwear full time.  When asked about how he made the switch from marketing to footwear design Juston said:

“I was working in the marketing department at Podium and one of my good friends was the design director for footwear.  He asked me to help color up some shoes for the season. Everyone really liked my vision, and my approach, so they offered me a full-time footwear job a few months later.”

Read More

17 Years…Where Has the Time Gone?

On Friday June 13th, 2014 we turned 17 years old.  If Ambush Board Co. were an individual, we would be able to drive our own car with up to 3 people (under the age of 21, that is) inside of it, but we’d still have to be home by the 12 AM curfew.  We would be close to graduating high school and looking for prospective colleges to spend our prime partyin’ days.

But, we’re not just an individual.  In our minds we’re a revolutionary business.  What have we done in the 17 years of our existence?  Here is a brief and very abridged rundown, as told through pictures.


In the late months of 1996 and the beginning of 1997, we were finalizing our first logo.

Original Ambush Board Co. Logo Ideas

Original logo ideas – late ’96/early ’97


Our first flyer/advertisement was released to get word out for our opening day.

1st Ambush Flyer/Advertisement 1997

1st Ambush flyer/advertisement

Friday June 13, 1997 Ambush opens its doors for the first time in a crawl space (a 1,200 sq. ft. shop in Kennesaw, GA).

Original Ambush Location

Original Ambush location


Ambush helps out Fat Mike from NOFX by promoting shows for his band and the bands signed by his label, Fat Wreck Chords.

Ambush Owner, Chuck Morrow, with the lead singer of NOFX, Michael Burkett 1998

Ambush owner, Chuck Morrow, with the lead singer of NOFX, Michael Burkett (Fat Mike) in 1998

It was getting a little cramped in our first shop, so in October ’98 we decided to upgrade and moved down the strip into a space almost triple what we started with at 3,500 square feet.

2nd Ambush Location

Chuck and GT

One of the first Frequent Buyer cards.

One of the Original Frequent Buyer Cards

One of the original Frequent Buyer cards

Let’s fast forward a little, but check out all the stuff that happened in between on our timeline!


Ambush Board Co. co-founders (Chuck Morrow, Lee Elliott, and Eric Elliott) are featured in an article in Level X magazine on “the new look of extreme sports business.”

Level X Magazine - 2002

Level X magazine – 2002

2003 was launched in 2001, but was operating out of the back storage room of the shop.  2 years later, we were able to move into their own warehouse, where all the magic started happening.

2003 gets its own space- Original team members

2003 – gets its own space.  These are the original team members (L-R: Ryan Kearns, Derek Davis, John Turnbull, Paul Lizon, Cameron McLane, Kit Furderer, and Eric Elliott).

2004 puts out one of its very first magazine ads.

One of the original ADs 04/05

One of the original ads – April ’05

Ambush and host Georgia’s first night pro rail competition, Slider Slam.

Parks Bonifay 2004 Slider Slam

Parks Bonifay at the 2004 Slider Slam


Our Skate team poses for a photo session.

2005 Skate Team

2005 Skate Team (L-R: Dustin Hart, Stormy Pruett, Frank Lee, Charles Chatov, JJ Patterson, and Wade Johnson)

Ambush holds its first street contest in the parking lot of the shop.

1st Street Contest 2005

1st Street Contest – 2005

Crowd shot at the 1st Street Conest

Crowd shot at the 1st Street Contest


The Liquid Force Slideshow is held in our parking lot.

Ambush hosts the 2006 Liquid Force Slideshow

Ambush hosts the 2006 Liquid Force Slideshow


Ambush owners, Chuck Morrow, Eric Elliott, and Lee Elliott, talk shop with the Marietta Daily Journal about working in a family business.

2007 Article on family businesses

2007 article on family businesses


One of many 2-page spreads in Alliance Wakeboard Magazine.

Double page Alliance Wakeboard Magazine Spread ad in Alliance


We are accidentally sent bright red, bejeweled button-ups in an inventory shipment…perfect time for our warehouse guys to have a photo op.

Modeling their Bedazzled ensembles (L-R: Billy Witcher, Garrett Bauman, Gary Sargent, Ryan Parks, Jeremy Kline, Nick Bode, Danny Peterson, Kyle McEaddy, Ben Mercer, Cameron McLane, Alamo, Tres Morgan, and Eric Elliott)

Modeling their bedazzled ensembles (L-R: Billy Witcher, Garrett Bauman, Gary Sargent, Ryan Parks, Jeremy Kline, Nick Bode, Danny Peterson, Kyle McEaddy, Ben Mercer, Cameron McLane, Alamo, Tres Morgan, and Eric Elliott)


In September 2013, Ambush headquarters was relocated to a new pro office space.

Creative & Sales Team along with Chuck Morrow  (Founder of Ambush) and Tony Finn  (Inventor of wakeboading and founder of Liquid Force)

Creative & Sales Team along with Chuck Morrow (Founder of Ambush) and Tony Finn (one of the forefathers of wakeboarding and founder and CEO of Liquid Force)


Even though we have made many more memories since 2013, we thought we would share some memorable highlights from our first years in the business.  We love what we do and are just as, if not more, excited and motivated than ever.  We’re looking forward to seeing what else we can accomplish as we continue to push the progression of Board Sports retail.  For our full timeline check out

On the Red Couch with Jordan Smith, Mitch Shutters, and Matt Mazza

Take a look inside the beautiful mind of Matt Mazza

65 Degrees and Sunny

In my opinion, there is only one thing to do on a perfect weather day. That is go skate. Cool, blue skies, a light breeze and fresh Georgia air got me out of the house real quick. I rounded up a couple of the Ambush boys Wes and Zeke as well as the good homies Dakota Plumley and Brenden Lagna. We all met up at the new Kennesaw Skatepark to start a sweet day of shredding. We put in a solid 5 hours of non stop skating. Here is a little montage to show what we got!


Top 5 Smoke Shows that Can Ride Better than You

In the past several years, women have made a huge impact on Action Sports.   My favorite part of the impact they’ve made…how sexy they make riding a board.  I’m going to keep this short and sweet.   Here are my top 5 smoke shows that can ride better than you.


5. Jamie Anderson – Pro Snowboarder

Jamie Anderson just came off with the biggest win of her career.   She won the first-ever Women’s Slopestyle at the 2014 Sochi Olympics.   She has had a solid resume of podium finishes throughout her career.   She can do handstands in bikinis, as well…that deserves a gold.

Jamie Anderson can melt you with her smile.

Jamie Anderson Indy Grab

Jamie Anderson Bikini Handstand

Check her out on Instagram @JamieAndersonSnow

4. Dallas Friday – Pro Wakeboarder

Dallas Friday is the most seasoned rider on this list, but don’t let that fool you.   A former gymnast in her younger years, she turned pro at age 14.   She has a collection of X Games medals and is still making podium finishes to this day.

Dallas Friday on the Cover of the Wake Journal Bikini Issue

Dallas Friday Stinky Sweet Indy Grab

Dallas Friday Is Sexy

Check her out on Instagram @DallasFriday

3. Torah Bright – Pro Snowboarder

Even though she got the Silver in the 2014 Sochi Olympic Women’s Halfpipe, she won Gold in my heart after I watched the post-run interview.   That Australian accent…and she has more style than any women’s pipe rider.   And…she looks fantastic in a trash can.

Torah Bright is cute as all get out

Torah Bright Tweaked out Method Grab

Torah Bright Being Sexy in a Trash Can

Check out her on Instagram @TorahBright

2. Silje Norendal – Pro Snowboarder

I know nothing about her besides she makes Norway and women’s snowboarding look really good.   She placed 11th out of 12 in Women’s Slopestyle Finals at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, but she got number one in my heart.  Oh, and Silje is back-to-back Gold Medalist for the past two X-Games in Slopestyle.

I'd drink Silje Norendal's bathwater.

Silje Norendal Spinning and Grabbing

Silje Norendal Looks Good

1. Alana Blanchard – Pro Surfer

This girl has been dominating by being the face of women’s surfing.   She recently took #1 Women’s Surfer Poll…possibly more for her looks than for her surfing, but I don’t care.  She makes surfing look really, really good.   Click here to view GoPro‘s amazing video of Alana surfing with some friends.

Alana Blanchard's Fantastic BehindAlana Blanchard Paddling Out 

More of Alana Blanchard's Terrific KeysterAlana Blanchard's bottom turn makes me squirm.


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