Ambush Alumni: Ryan Dearth

Since opening our doors in 1997, we have been blessed with a revolving door of badass staff.  While some have stayed to push Ambush further in its evolution and to help cultivate the next group of young up-and-comers, others have gone out on their own and accomplished some pretty rad sh!t.   This is an ode to those who used Ambush as their career launch pad.  Whether you recognize them or not, their presence was highly valued during their time spent at Ambush…and we’re hyped that these guys are out there making moves and doing big things.

DVS Skateboarding Filmer

Ryan Dearth grew up skateboarding and filming his friends here in the Atlanta area.  He started working at Ambush in 1999, when the store was still located in the shopping center across the street from its current location, right next to Sidelines and whatever that laser tag joint was called at the time.  After his time at Ambush and years spent filming and submitting footage to 411VM and ON Video, Ryan left Georgia for sunny California.  Using some of the connections he made from working at the shop and sending in his footage, Dearth had gotten a job in the DVS warehouse and worked his way into an in-house filmer/editor position for DVS and Matix.

It is no surprise that the skateboard industry rivals Fort Knox when it comes to entry or employment.  Almost every kid’s dream as soon as he/she stepped on a skateboard was to become a professional skateboarder.  For some..that dream still lives, but many of us find out that the ability and talent required may exceed our physical capabilities.  Without losing the passion or love for skateboarding, the next logical step would be to aspire to work for a company related to skateboarding, whether that be board, shoes, or clothing companies.

I asked Ryan to give any advice for someone looking to follow a similar path.

Starting off, make a dope shop video and pass it around to the mags, the Berrics and any of the shop riders’ sponsors. Study videos. Pay attention to angles and editing for ideas. Make sure you’re settings and filming are on point. Film anything and everything. It’s like anything else you do, the more you do it the better you are. If you work for a shop, take advantage and create your own content for the site, i.e. trick tips, parts, board set-ups, contests, video release parties with interviews (it sucks to do, but its a learning experience). Do online tutorials in your spare time, i.e. editing, color correcting, effects, lighting, audio, video…if it’s truly your passion do what you can to be great at it in all aspects.

You pretty much have to move to CA to be a skate filmer…. Having an outgoing personality is a plus. Put yourself out there to make things happen. Just moving to CA isn’t gonna make it happen, unless you already have an in somewhere or with someone.

A lot of what got me to where I am today was on-the-job-training and working with other people.

The saying “It’s all about who you know” is completely true.

Unfortunately, there is no sure-fire way to get a cool industry job.  One recurring theme after asking a bunch of people who work within the skate industry is that most of them feel as though they were in the right place at the right time.  The only way for that to happen is to put yourself in enough situations where that kind of opportunity can arise.  Basically, pack your bags, you’re going to California.

Enjoy some old and new pieces of Dearth’s work…

“Dirty South” – Late 90’s – Early 2000’s

DVS Does Detroit

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Skateboarder and skate enthusiast for more than a decade.

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